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The Great Gatsby

Fitzgerald, F. Scott (Book )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
The Great Gatsby
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Item Details

Authors: Fitzgerald, F. Scott (Francis Scott), 1896-1940
Title: The great Gatsby
Notes: First published in 1925
ISBN: 0743273567
068416325X
0020199600
0023381205
0684830426
0685108872
0684801523
Statement of Responsibility: by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Subject Headings: Long Island (N.Y.) Fiction Revenge Fiction Mistresses Fiction Rich people Fiction First loves Fiction Traffic accidents Fiction
Topical Term: Revenge
Mistresses
Rich people
First loves
Traffic accidents
LCCN: 25010468
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Aug 08, 2014
  • TopGradeMilk rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

it took me quite a while to get into this book but in the end, thinking about it, i'm really glad i read this book. some parts were a little hard to comprehend though.

Jul 24, 2014
  • AngelFire101 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Really enjoyed how this book showed how opinions are formed of the rich and the poor.

Jul 23, 2014
  • Divine19 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

In every book, there's always that character I despise; in this one, it's everybody.

But it was a decent read.

Totally Love this book! So heartbreaking.

Jul 12, 2014
  • sfogs rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

A short story and a bit of a sad one, I felt sorry for Gatsby and really didn't like Tom.

A patron review from the Adult Summer Game: "This book is a timeless story of love, despair and the want for more. Gatsby was disillusioned by many things, and although he had an immensely extravagant life built for himself, how he felt inside was empty. The story twists and turns, each sentence building off of itself perfectly. If you're looking for a summer read that's both enjoyable, and that you can draw wisdom from, you've found it here."

Jul 07, 2014
  • arsolarik rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

I'm glad I read this, it's an ok story though.

Set in 1922 in New York, The Great Gatsby is the story of eccentric millionaire Jay Gatsby as told by Nick Carraway, a young man from the Midwest who lives on Long Island and works in Manhattan. Gatsby’s enormous mansion is adjacent to Carraway’s modest home, and Carraway becomes curious about his neighbor after being invited to one of his famous parties. Nick soon learns that Gatsby is in love Daisy Buchanan, Nick’s cousin and the wife of one Tom Buchanan, an acquaintance of Nick’s from Yale. Tom takes Nick on a trip for a day in the city, where Nick learns that Tom has a kept woman, Myrtle Wilson, the wife of a long island mechanic and is cheating on Daisy.
Gatsby sends a message to Nick through their mutual friend, professional golfer Jordan Baker, asking Nick to arrange a meeting for him and Daisy. Nick learns that Gatsby and Daisy had once been in love, but Daisy married Tom while Gatsby was in Europe during the Great War, and was too poor to be able to marry her. Somehow, Gatsby then managed to acquire millions of dollars. Gatsby chose the site of his house in Long Island because it was across the bay from Daisy’s house, from which a green light could be seen at night.
The Great Gatsby is a window through which the reader can discover the American lifestyle of the 1920s. Fitzgerald is able to illustrate the idea of the “American Dream” – the accumulation of wealth and power by any mean. The Great Gatsby is truly a great book with an outstanding plot twist and characters so realistic that they seem to come to life before you

The Great Gatsby revolves around an extremely rich man, Gatsby who throws these extravagant parties, all to get his lover back. It is narrated by Nick Caraway, Jay Gatsby's next door neighbor, a distance cousin of Gatsby's lover, Daisy- who is now married. The Great Gatsby is a novel I wanted to read for some time now and I was super excited when I finally got my hands on a copy. It was definitely an interesting read, and I loved the feel of it being set in the 1920s. The 1920s was most certainly a fascinating era, as everything was changing so quickly, the world was shaping into what it is today. One of the main central issues in the great Gatsby that Fitzgerald does an excellent job of illustrating is power and money. He captures money's power to corrupt, one of my favourite quotes that illustrates this is "They were careless people — Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money …” saying that the rich escape from the consequences of their actions through the comfort of money. What I also found about this novel is that even though it has taken place a long time ago, it remains relevant. People can still read this and connect to Gatsby, Daisy or Tom. Even though the world has come so far from what it had been in the 1920s, we as humans did not change all that much. We still feel that same emotions of love, hate and betrayal and this will never change as long as we interact with one another in terms of love, loyalty and friendship.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a timeless and classic novel that I really enjoyed. The Great Gatsby is a story about a mysterious man by the name of Jay Gatsby and his love for greatness and an already married woman by the name of Daisy Buchannan. Through the eyes of a man named Nick Carraway; Daisy’s cousin and Gatsby’s neighbor we see the rise and the tragic fall of Gatsby, a man who dreamt big and passionately. Throughout the novel we see a deadly love triangle form between Gatsby, Daisy and her very rich husband Tom Buchanan, while Nick and others see witness the disasters that come from this triangle. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is a novel that despite taking place in the 1920’s is still a relevant novel today. Some of the main themes of The Great Gatsby include Love and Deceit. The Characters throughout this novel go through a lot of development. I found myself loving than hating some characters in this book and other characters I felt a great attachment to.The Great Gatsby is novel that starts off really slow, it may seem dull and boring to some, but if you keep reading you’ll be hooked to this unique story line. Fitzgerald’s writing itself is very unique, the book is very well written. You will learn a few new words after finishing this novel. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is classic novel and is definitely worth the read, I would rate it a 9/10!

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Sep 02, 2014
  • blue_dog_12782 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

blue_dog_12782 thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

Jun 19, 2014
  • kiisu rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

kiisu thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

blue_panda_790 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

Aug 31, 2013
  • EuSei rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

EuSei thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

Jul 12, 2013
  • Sagarpp3 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Sagarpp3 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Jul 08, 2013
  • platypus101 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

platypus101 thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Jun 29, 2013
  • red_bird_721 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

red_bird_721 thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Mar 06, 2013
  • Kristen Merke rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Kristen Merke thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

Mar 05, 2013
  • Minjeung rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Minjeung thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

Jun 14, 2012
  • EDGAR AQUINO rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

EDGAR AQUINO thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

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Jul 09, 2014
  • JODI ARONOFF rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

The Great Gatsby , F. Scott Fitzgerald's third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted "gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession," it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s. The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.

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Jul 10, 2013
  • Nataliasay97 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Nick lives next door to a mysterious man named Gatsby, who throws parties. Nick becomes friends with him and learns that he is in love with Daisy.

Tom is suspicious of this, and he tries to prove that Gatsby is not who he seems. Daisy says that she will leave Tom for Gatsby.
Daisy then refuses to leave Tom for him, and makes him drive her home. Daisy is at the wheel when the car hits someone- coincidentally, Myrtle Wilson, Tom's other woman.

Mr. Wilson discovers his wife's affair, and asks around about the car that hit her . So, thinking that Gatsby hit her, Mr. Wilson goes to Gatsby's house and shoots him, and then shoots himself.

Gatsby dies alone, because no one shows up to his funeral except for Nick and his father.

Jun 18, 2012
  • tt14 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

This book was so fun and crazy at the same time. Got to check it out.

May 21, 2010
  • mbazal rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

“The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time where gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession, it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s."

Poor officer Gatsby falls in love with flighty Daisy, but while he is away overseas she marries another man. He returns years later as a mysterious millionaire and tries to win her back.

Jan 23, 2009
  • heatherlynn rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

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Jul 10, 2013
  • Nataliasay97 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Other: uses some terms such as bootlegging

Mar 04, 2013
  • Hello_Seattle rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: Obviously because this book is about the jazz age, there is some sexual content as well as some drinking.

Other: irrevocable awesomeness.

Nov 24, 2008
  • mbazal rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: This title contains Sexual Content.

Quotes

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A breeze blew through the room, blew curtains in at one end and out the other like pale flags, twisting them up toward the frosted wedding-cake of the ceiling, and then rippled over the wine-colored rug, making a shadow on it as wind does on the sea.

unjustly accused of being

Sep 22, 2013
  • ericnorcross rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Most of the big shore places are closed now, and there are hardly any lights except the shadowy moving glow of a ferry boat across the sound. As the moon rose higher the inessential houses began to melt away, until gradually I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailor's eyes. A fresh green breast of the new world. It's vanished trees, the trees that made way for Gatsby's house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams and for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood 'nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder.

Jul 16, 2013
  • Cumberbatch rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

“He smiled understandingly--much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four of five times in life. It faced--or seemed to face--the whole external world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor. It understood you just as far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself, and assured you that it had precisely the impression of you that, at your best, you hoped to convey. Precisely at that point it vanished--and I was looking at an elegant young roughneck, a year or two over thirty, whose elaborate formality of speech just missed being absurd. Some time before he introduced himself I’d got a strong impression that he was picking his words with care.”

Jul 13, 2013
  • orangeana rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

"He's just a man named Gatsby."

Jul 10, 2013
  • Nataliasay97 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

“There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired.” —Nick Carraway

Jul 08, 2013
  • platypus101 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.

Aug 09, 2012
  • dera444 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

They were careless people, Tom and Daisy--they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.

May 21, 2010
  • mbazal rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

"Whenever you feel like criticizing any one...just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had."

"I hope she'll be a fool - that's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool....You see, I think everything's terrible anyhow....And I know. I've been everywhere and seen everything and done everything."

"...with every word she was drawing further and further into herself, so he gave that up, and only the dead dream fought on as the afternoon slipped away, trying to touch what was no longer tangible, struggling unhappily, undespairingly, toward that lost voice across the room."

May 17, 2010
  • lisahiggs rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

"I was thirty. Before me stretched the portentous, menacing road of a new decade.

It was seven o’clock when we got into the coupé with him and started for Long Island. Tom talked incessantly, exulting and laughing, but his voice was as remote from Jordan and me as the foreign clamour on the sidewalk or the tumult of the elevated overhead. Human sympathy has its limits, and we were content to let all their tragic arguments fade with the city lights behind. Thirty – the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning briefcase of enthusiasm, thinning hair. But there was Jordan beside me, who, unlike Daisy, was too wise ever to carry well-forgotten dreams from age to age. As we passed over the dark bridge her wan face fell lazily against my coat’s shoulder and the formidable stroke of thirty died away with the reassuring pressure of her hand.

So we drove on toward death through the cooling twilight."

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Thug Notes take on The Great Gatsby

Not your average summary & analysis!

Author John Green on The Great Gatsby

John Green (Looking for Alaska, Paper Towns, and more) -- one half of the Vlogbrothers -- tells you what you need to know about Gatsby.

Find it at SCCLD

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Version pocillo (pocillo) Last updated 2014/09/02 11:42