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Atlas Shrugged

Rand, Ayn (Book - 1957 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Atlas Shrugged


Item Details

Authors: Rand, Ayn
Title: Atlas shrugged
Publisher: New York :, Random House,, 1957
Characteristics: 1168 p
ISBN: 0451191145
0525934189
0452011876
0525948929
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Report This Sep 02, 2013
  • ecrl rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Instead of giving trash literature to teens, teachers should have them read this book. It would open their eyes to the evils of socialism. But... yet, maybe this is the reason why they push trash literature instead: don't teach them to think critically, keep them ignorant and complacent. This book is a must read for anyone who would like to understand Capitalism. Together with 1984 and Animal Farm, it forms a trilogy that departs from the typical academic litany.

Report This Sep 01, 2013
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Ayn Rand—born Alisa Zinovievna Rosenbaum in St. Petersburg, Russia, in February 2, 1905–was an Objectivist, not a Conservative. She died at home on March 6, 1982, of heart failure. Although I disagree in several instances with Mrs. Rand’s philosophy, Atlas Shrugged is a brilliant, respectful manifesto of human accomplishment. Yes, it's also about individualism, which is what Human Beings are made of—we are individuals, not masses to be used by some fascist, socialist or communist government, as it happens in the book. Rand fled communism and writes with authority on the subject of government taking over our individualism. But you don’t need to be a political junkie to read her book! By the way, Francisco d'Anconia tells Dagny: "Contradictions do not exist. Whenever you think you are facing a contradiction, check your premises. You will find that one of them is wrong." In other words: doubt yourself, you might be laboring under false “premises”! It is hard for someone (who really read this book!) to, even as a joke, perceive anything else but what Rand meant. Long live individualism, accomplishment and freedom. (Worth watching are the two excellent movie adaptations of this book, part I and part II, with a third one coming in 2013.) PS: I hope this is not taken as harsh criticism, but “the rest of the country withers in hunger and darkness” BECAUSE of government control. The “smart and industrious” did not create a “utopia,” but were forced by the heavy hand of government to retire to a place where they would be allowed the freedoms they no longer enjoyed. If you this in mind while reading Atlas Shrugged, it all makes sense.

Report This Jun 21, 2013
  • Andrewkohnen rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

I'll be honest reading these comments I get a vibe that this is a great place for conspiracy theorists to hang out. Either case it seems this book is very polarizing.

Report This Apr 19, 2013
  • joekingaround rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

The storytelling got me engaged, but I soon started picking out flaws. (This is not my tendency.) At first I disregarded them, the author revealing her own character rather than her characters, for example. And chug along I did, enjoying passages. But the philosophy got heavy handed. I on one hand granted that too much government control can surely ruin people's lives, like hers was. But a utopia for the smart and industrious while the rest of the country withers in hunger and darkness just didn't settle well with me. The extremes are both wrong. I wonder if the controversial nature of the book, not the greatness of the story, might be responsible for its staggering success.

Report This Feb 18, 2013
  • Mee2 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This is a story of what each person can accomplish hindered by the staggering weight of government--in other words, very little. Unless you are Dagny Taggart, that is. Rand lived in an oppressive regime--communist Russia--and wrote with expertise on the matter. Her book should open the eyes of our modern voters to what the future will bring. People who didn't read this book or are hardcore liberal, cannot grasp the depths of its philosophy, therefore should not attempt to write reviews; in this case, ignorance is NOT bliss. Incidentally, I am yet to find the “act of cannibalism” at the end of the book. There are references to cannibals/cannibalism, but no act per se.

Report This Feb 18, 2013
  • DebAK rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Wonderful book, but might be difficult to digest and understand for the ones who embrace government oriented economic philosophies—like, for instance, socialism. A MUST read, especially for the young. (Watch the movie: it’s a great rendition of this book.)

I think the technical term for this pseudo-philosophy book is CRAP. I am sorry that I cannot give it negative stars. Also, Ayn Rand was an avowed atheist.

Report This Jan 16, 2013
  • xaipe rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs. Greed is good. If you accept that and agree with it you will love this book. The reoccurring phrase "check your premises" brings up an image of someone going around their property with a flashlight after a power outage rather than an intellectual challenge. Rand has no distance from her characters which are one-dimensional caricatures. I am always suspicious of someone like Rand with no sense of humor or the absurd. This book is narrated through tightly clenched teeth with a tightly clenched mind. It's a tea party precursor. Or worse.

Report This Jan 16, 2013
  • xaipe rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.” Greed is good. If you accept that and agree with it you will love this book. The reoccurring phrase "check your premises" brings up an image of someone going around their property with a flashlight after a power outage rather than an intellectual challenge. Rand has no distance from her characters which are one-dimensional caricatures. I am always suspicious of someone like Rand with no sense of humor or the absurd. This book is narrated through tightly clenched teeth with a tightly clenched mind. It's a tea party precursor. Or worse.

Some seriously sicko comments here --- hopefully they are all affiliated or related to all those crooked banksters and derivatives dealers. (And please, please don't vote!)

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Report This Sep 23, 2012
  • ecrl rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

ecrl thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

Report This Sep 20, 2012
  • AmandaVollmershausen rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

AmandaVollmershausen thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Report This Sep 14, 2012
  • susienor rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

susienor thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

Report This Aug 16, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

EuSei thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Report This Aug 16, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

EuSei thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Report This Aug 14, 2012
  • Mee2 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Mee2 thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

rwh77 thinks this title is suitable for 21 years and under

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Report This Aug 14, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Money is a tool of exchange, which can't exist unless there are goods produced and men able to produce them. Money is the material shape of the principle that men who wish to deal with one another must deal by trade and give value for value. -Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged, Part 2, Ch. 2

Report This Aug 14, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Love is our response to our highest values — and can be nothing else. -Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged, Part 2, Ch. 4

Report This Aug 14, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

You do not have to depend on any material possessions, they depend on you, you create them, you own the one and only tool of production. -Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged, Part 2, Ch. 8

Report This Aug 14, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

What's wealth but the means of expanding one's life? There's two ways one can do it: either by producing more or by producing it faster. -Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged, Part 3, Ch. 1

Report This Aug 14, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I thought by the time the sun was exhausted, men would find a substitute. -Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged, Part 1, Ch. 7

Report This Aug 14, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

If one's actions are honest, one does not need the predated confidence of others, only their rational perception. -Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged, Part 1, Ch. 6

Report This Jun 11, 2011
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

“Every man builds his world in his own image... He has the power to choose, but no power to escape the necessity of choice.” Hugh Akston

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Report This Jan 28, 2012
  • EuSei rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Atlas Shrugged, the movie

Ayn Rand would probably approve the way her story was portrayed in this movie. Hopefully, public libraries will soon have the DVD available!

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