Shoah

Shoah

DVD - 2003
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9
The Nazi extermination of Jews is examined through interviews of survivors, witnesses and perpetrators and through footage of the sites of the death camps and environs as they appear today. Those interviewed include Jewish survivors of the death camps and the Warsaw ghetto uprising, Polish farmers and villagers who lived near the camps and Nazis who worked in the camps and the ghettos.
Publisher: Hollywood, CA : New Yorker Video, c2003
ISBN: 9781567303179
156730317X
Branch Call Number: DVD 940.5318 SHOAH
Characteristics: 4 videodiscs (566 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in

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l
lukasevansherman
Jun 30, 2019

You can't really rate or comment on this film, you simply have to see it and let it overwhelm you. One of the most important documentaries ever made.

e
empbee
Jan 19, 2019

This documentary stays with you for days. Recommended for everyone above 10 years of age.

b
Barbdesign
Sep 02, 2018

The impacts of this film are beyond words. Think of it -- there is not one single photograph of the interior of any of the gas chambers, either crowded with living people, or crowded with their dead bodies. Not one. But this film, it allows us to experience the Shoah more so than any archive or documentary. Lanzmann's memory and his works are a blessing.

a
akirakato
Feb 01, 2018

Directed by Claude Lanzmann in 1985, this 6-DISC 566-minute French documentary delves into the Holocaust.
Unlike other Holocaust films, this one includes no archival footage.
The film presents Lanzmann's interviews with survivors, witnesses and perpetrators during visits to German Holocaust sites across Poland, including extermination camps.
Instead of excavating the past, the director seems to concentrate on the feelings of the surviving interviewees.
Although I understand the director's point, he should've discovered some never-seen-before footage.
Such footage could give the audience much more convincing impact.
A picture of Holocaust must be worth thousands of words.

d
DMRose
Jul 26, 2016

No doubt one of the most important documentaries to be produced in the 20th century. I could only manage to watch the first disc (2 hours) as I found it too upsetting, disturbing, sad, appalling, many words come to mind. Nonetheless it was necessary for someone to produce this tribute to the courage of the witnesses and to document the perpetrators on film. Bravo to Mr. Lanzmann, whose film and dedication is worthy of a Nobel Prize.

1
1aa
Apr 06, 2016

At over nine hours for the film itself and over twelve if you include the extras, this requires of the viewer a far greater amount of attention, patience, and seriousness than what they might be used to giving. Its certainly a 'necessary' film for those interested in both history and film history. I highly recommend it.

brendancarlson Jun 12, 2014

One of the most amazing, as well as intellectually and emotionally exhausting documentaries I've ever seen.

ravenheart Jul 09, 2013

If for no other reason, everyone should watch this to see how the holocaust was actually carried out. The film does this via description by living witnesses, while often visiting the sites where these events occurred, not via stock wartime footage. I watched this over the course of several nights, as nearly all of the film contains subtitled back-and forth translations, and even though the subject matter is engaging, it becomes somewhat boring during extended viewing. (The only reason I didn't give this 5 stars was because of the tedious way the translations were handled.)

Not many people have a clear picture of how and where the holocaust was actually carried out, and we all should. Mass murder makes routine appearances throughout human history, and the Jewish certainly weren't the first or last to fall victims to it. The Nazis weren't just an aberration, and there were many, many people who fully supported what they did, as becomes very evident when you hear first-person accounts of the Polish actually cheering as the Jews were hauled to their deaths packed into train cars like cattle.

Individuals should never abdicate responsibility for their own personal defense to the police or military, because history shows us over and over what happens to groups of people who aren't equipped and prepared to defend themselves.

r
richibi
Nov 17, 2012

lest we forget, a haunting account of the horrors of Auschwitz, and by extension of all the other World War ll Nazi extermination camps, by the very few who survived; a harrowing but indispensable document, testament, wherein those who had tried to dehumanize an entire people are ultimately themselves confirmed inhuman by their flagrantly monstrous acts; though all their innocent and defenceless victims may now rest in eternal peace this movie will remain their quiet thunder

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