Love After Love

Love After Love

A Novel

Book - 2020
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"After Betty Ramdin's abusive husband dies, she invites a colleague, Mr. Chetan, to move in with her and her son, Solo, as their lodger. Over time, these three form an unconventional family, loving each other deeply and depending upon one another. Then, one a fateful night, Solo overhears Betty confiding in Mr. Chetan and learns a secret that plunges him into torment. Ultimately sends him running to live a lonely life in New York City, devastating Betty in the process. Yet, both Solo and Betty are buoyed by the continuing love and friendship of Mr. Chetan, until his own burdensome secret is uncovered with heart breaking consequences. In vibrant, addictive Trinidadian prose, Love After Love questions who and how we love, the obligations of family, and the consequences of choices made in desperation"-- Provided by publisher.
Publisher: New York : One World, [2020]
Edition: First U.S. edition
ISBN: 9780593157565
9780593157572
Branch Call Number: FICTION PERSAUD INGRID
Characteristics: 326 pages ; 24 cm

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After Betty Ramdin’s husband dies, she invites a colleague, Mr. Chetan, to move in with her and her son, Solo. Over time, the three become a family, loving each other deeply and depending upon one another. Then, one fateful night, Solo overhears Betty confiding in Mr. Chetan and learns a secret t... Read More »


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u
uncommonreader
Sep 30, 2020

A novel about family and different kinds of love. I enjoyed the rhythm of the Trini prose.

b
brangwinn
Aug 16, 2020

After reading the book, I returned to the Walcott poem “Love After Love” and found the words “Give back your Heart / to itself” the embodiment of the theme of the novel. In her debut novel Persaud give tribute to Derek Walcott, who lived in Trinidad. Told in three voices, it is the story of a non-traditional Trinidadian family. First there’s Betty, who was raising her son, Solo after her drunken, violent, abusive husband fell down the stairs of their home and died. Mr. Chetan, the quiet, in-the-closet guy teacher who rents a room from her and becomes a surrogate husband to Betty and surrogate father to Solo gives us a look at the restrictive side of Trinidad-Tobago. And then there’s Solo, who when told the truth about his father’s death moves to New York City in anger. In the first part of the book, pain is replaced by love. But love isn’t easy. In the second, Betty struggles raising a teen-aged Solo. Mr. Chetan struggles with his sexual identity and Solo struggles with himself and his anger toward his mom. It’s the ending of the story that is most powerful. It takes the murder of Mr. Chetan for both Betty and Solo to understand the depth of love. Solo struggles to explain to others who Mr. Chetan is and how he is related to Mr. Chetan and it dawn on his what love is. As a reader who has visited many Caribbean Islands, I loved the voice that Ms. Persaud gives to Trinidad and the sly comparisons to other islands. My favorite line is the book is Betty’s advice to Mr. Chetan in finding love. “Do it while your teeth are in your mouth and not in a glass by the sink.” Love comes in many forms.

u
Urbano
Aug 09, 2020

When I picked up this book with it's beautiful cover, the word 'love' in the title and its lush Caribbean island setting, I have to admit I thought I was settling in for a light, pleasant read. Was I ever mistaken. But don't get me wrong. This is a great book--just not the 'up-lit' read I'd been expecting. Within pages, I was hooked into the horrid situation Betty and her son find themselves in, found myself breathing a sigh of relief when the lovely Mr. Chetan comes to live with them, worried about the various twists and blows life deals to all three.

This is the first novel I've read by a Trinidadian author and I loved how Persaud created such a rich world for her characters. The food, the language and the setting are all so beautifully drawn that, even though I've never been to Trinidad, I felt like I was there. I especially loved how quickly the story travels through time, skilfully covering quite a long time span in a relatively short number of pages. Though I loved Betty and Mr, Chetan and wasn't as gripped by Solo's story, I still am really glad I read this novel and recommend it to anyone with an interest in international fiction.

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